In My Father's Country: An Afghan Woman Defies Her Fate

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  • Additional Information
    • Publication Information:
      American Library Association
    • Publication Date:
      2012
    • Abstract:
      In My Father's Country: An Afghan Woman Defies Her Fate. By Saima Wahab. Apr. 2012. 352p. Crown, $25 (9780307884947). 958.104. Wahab was just three years old when her [...]
    • ISSN:
      0006-7385
    • Rights:
      COPYRIGHT 2012 American Library Association
      Copyright 2012 Gale, Cengage Learning. All rights reserved.
    • Accession Number:
      edsgcl.287956569
  • Citations
    • ABNT:
      HUNTLEY, K. In My Father’s Country: An Afghan Woman Defies Her Fate. Booklist, [s. l.], v. 108, n. 16, p. 17, 2012. Disponível em: http://widgets.ebscohost.com/prod/customlink/proxify/proxify.php?count=1&encode=0&proxy=&find_1=&replace_1=&target=http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=edsglr&AN=edsgcl.287956569&authtype=sso&custid=s1007886. Acesso em: 2 jul. 2020.
    • AMA:
      Huntley K. In My Father’s Country: An Afghan Woman Defies Her Fate. Booklist. 2012;108(16):17. http://widgets.ebscohost.com/prod/customlink/proxify/proxify.php?count=1&encode=0&proxy=&find_1=&replace_1=&target=http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=edsglr&AN=edsgcl.287956569&authtype=sso&custid=s1007886. Accessed July 2, 2020.
    • AMA11:
      Huntley K. In My Father’s Country: An Afghan Woman Defies Her Fate. Booklist. 2012;108(16):17. Accessed July 2, 2020. http://widgets.ebscohost.com/prod/customlink/proxify/proxify.php?count=1&encode=0&proxy=&find_1=&replace_1=&target=http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=edsglr&AN=edsgcl.287956569&authtype=sso&custid=s1007886
    • APA:
      Huntley, K. (2012, April 15). In My Father’s Country: An Afghan Woman Defies Her Fate. Booklist, 108(16), 17.
    • Chicago/Turabian: Author-Date:
      Huntley, Kristine. 2012. “In My Father’s Country: An Afghan Woman Defies Her Fate.” Booklist, April 15. http://widgets.ebscohost.com/prod/customlink/proxify/proxify.php?count=1&encode=0&proxy=&find_1=&replace_1=&target=http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=edsglr&AN=edsgcl.287956569&authtype=sso&custid=s1007886.
    • Harvard:
      Huntley, K. (2012) ‘In My Father’s Country: An Afghan Woman Defies Her Fate’, Booklist, 15 April, p. 17. Available at: http://widgets.ebscohost.com/prod/customlink/proxify/proxify.php?count=1&encode=0&proxy=&find_1=&replace_1=&target=http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=edsglr&AN=edsgcl.287956569&authtype=sso&custid=s1007886 (Accessed: 2 July 2020).
    • Harvard: Australian:
      Huntley, K 2012, ‘In My Father’s Country: An Afghan Woman Defies Her Fate’, Booklist, vol. 108, no. 16, p. 17, viewed 2 July 2020, .
    • MLA:
      Huntley, Kristine. “In My Father’s Country: An Afghan Woman Defies Her Fate.” Booklist, vol. 108, no. 16, Apr. 2012, p. 17. EBSCOhost, widgets.ebscohost.com/prod/customlink/proxify/proxify.php?count=1&encode=0&proxy=&find_1=&replace_1=&target=http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=edsglr&AN=edsgcl.287956569&authtype=sso&custid=s1007886.
    • Chicago/Turabian: Humanities:
      Huntley, Kristine. “In My Father’s Country: An Afghan Woman Defies Her Fate.” Booklist, April 15, 2012. http://widgets.ebscohost.com/prod/customlink/proxify/proxify.php?count=1&encode=0&proxy=&find_1=&replace_1=&target=http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=edsglr&AN=edsgcl.287956569&authtype=sso&custid=s1007886.
    • Vancouver/ICMJE:
      Huntley K. In My Father’s Country: An Afghan Woman Defies Her Fate. Booklist [Internet]. 2012 Apr 15 [cited 2020 Jul 2];108(16):17. Available from: http://widgets.ebscohost.com/prod/customlink/proxify/proxify.php?count=1&encode=0&proxy=&find_1=&replace_1=&target=http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=edsglr&AN=edsgcl.287956569&authtype=sso&custid=s1007886

Reviews

Booklist Reviews 2012 April #2

Wahab was just three years old when her father was taken from her family home in Kabul, Afghanistan, by the KGB after he spoke out against the Russian invaders. After fleeing Afghanistan for Pakistan, Wahab and her siblings are sent to live with two uncles in Portland, Oregon, where she receives an education in line with her father's wishes. When a friend calls Wahab about an opportunity with the military for a Pashtu-English speaker, she sees a chance to return to Afghanistan and better understand her father's activism. Despite her sister's caution that "they stone women like you there," Wahab finds that her desire to interact with Afghan people outweighs the dangers. Wahab's skills as a translator prove invaluable in settings as varied as hospitals, political gatherings, and refugee camps. Despite her professional success, romance proves trickier for Wahab, who frankly reveals her fears of committing to a man and losing herself in the process. Wahab offers an inside look at the complexities of post-Taliban Afghanistan and its relationship with the U.S. in this engrossing memoir. Copyright 2012 Booklist Reviews.

PW Reviews 2012 March #3

Wahab's father welcomed her into the world with fanfare typically accorded the birth of a son—gunshots into the Afghan sky. Though his friends chastised him for celebrating a daughter in such a way, Wahab's father insisted his daughter would "do more for her people than one hundred sons combined." Three years later, in 1979, he was captured by the KGB for speaking out against Soviet involvement in Afghanistan. He never returned. After being shuffled to the care of her progressive grandfather, Wahab eventually wound up with her uncle in Portland, Oreg. Though she completed high school in only three years, Wahab could no longer abide her uncle's strict enforcement of Pashtun gender-biased codes of conduct, so she moved out. After college, determined to live up to her father's hopes, Wahab became an interpreter for American forces in Afghanistan. As one of the military's few speakers of Pashtu—a complex and heavily-coded language—Wahab became a spokesperson for her culture, educating her colleagues and helping them to establish relationships with her fellow Pashtun people. In vibrant but understated prose, Wahab vividly portrays a misunderstood culture, as well as the tense life on military bases where everyone must wear body armor and carry a weapon. While fighting to build a bridge of understanding between her "native and adoptive nations," Wahab admirably wages a more universal war—for gender equality, human rights, and peace. (Apr.)

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