Raven plays ball: situating 'Indian Sports Days' within indigenous and colonial spaces in twentieth-century coastal British Columbia

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  • Additional Information
    • Publication Information:
      University of Toronto Press
    • Publication Date:
      2015
    • Subject Terms:
    • Abstract:
      The experiences of coastal Indigenous communities in British Columbia playing Western sports in the early twentieth century seems to be a trickster tale. (2) Sports defy simple characterizations as either [...]
      Beginning in the nineteenth century, Anglo-Canadian colonial agents (residential school administrators and teachers, missionaries, and government officials) introduced a number of Western-style sporting activities among Indigenous peoples through athletic clubs, church gatherings, and school physical fitness programs. In keeping with a Victorian conception of leisure, these elites understood sports in moral terms, believing that they would support 'civilizing projects' intended to remake Indigenous socio-cultural spaces into colonial ones. Indigenous communities, however, used these same sports organizations to challenge, resist, and even displace colonial agendas. Inspired by J.R. Miller's treatment of Indigenous-non-Indigenous relations as a nuanced, multidirectional, often contradictory encounter, we argue that 'Indian Sports Days' in coastal British Columbia from the 1910S-1940S were complex social spaces, reflective of both Indigenous and colonial perspectives. Keywords: Aboriginal/Indigenous history; Indigenous studies; sport; twentieth century; British Columbia; colonialism; Canada Au debut du dix-neuvieme siecle, les agents de la colonisation anglo-canadiens (les administrateurs et enseignants des ecoles residentielles, les missionnaires et les fonctionnaires du gouvernement) presenterent au peuple autochtone un nombre d'activites sportives de style occidental a travers des clubs d'athletisme, des assemblees d'eglise et des programmes scolaires de culture physique. Conformement aux idees victoriennes sur le loisir, ces elites donnaient aux sports une valeur morale, croyant que les sports appuyaient leurs <> qui visaient la colonisation des espaces socio-culturels indigenes. Toutefois, les communautes autochtones se servaient de ces memes organisations sportives pour mettre au defi, voire meme refuser d'obtemperer et meme supplanter les programmes coloniaux. Prenant pour point de depart la vision de J.R. Miller que les traitements des relations indigenes-non-indigenes etaient des engagements nuances, multidirectionnels et souvent contradictoires, nous soutenons que les << journees sportives Indiennes >> sur les cotes de la Colombie-Britannique durant les annees 1910-1940, etaient en fait des espaces sociaux complexes refletant les deux perspectives indigene et coloniale. Mots-cles : histoire des autochtones/peuples indigenes; etudes indigenes; sports; vingtieme siecle; Colombie-Britannique; colonialisme; Canada
    • ISSN:
      0008-4107
    • Accession Number:
      10.3138/CJH.ACH.50.3.003
    • Rights:
      Copyright 2015 Gale, Cengage Learning. All rights reserved.
      COPYRIGHT 2015 University of Toronto Press
    • Accession Number:
      edsgcl.443457665
  • Citations
    • ABNT:
      DOWNEY, A.; NEYLAN, S. Raven plays ball: situating “Indian Sports Days” within indigenous and colonial spaces in twentieth-century coastal British Columbia. Canadian Journal of History, [s. l.], n. 3, p. 442, 2015. Disponível em: . Acesso em: 20 jul. 2019.
    • AMA:
      Downey A, Neylan S. Raven plays ball: situating “Indian Sports Days” within indigenous and colonial spaces in twentieth-century coastal British Columbia. Canadian Journal of History. 2015;(3):442. doi:10.3138/CJH.ACH.50.3.003.
    • APA:
      Downey, A., & Neylan, S. (2015). Raven plays ball: situating “Indian Sports Days” within indigenous and colonial spaces in twentieth-century coastal British Columbia. Canadian Journal of History, (3), 442. https://doi.org/10.3138/CJH.ACH.50.3.003
    • Chicago/Turabian: Author-Date:
      Downey, Allan, and Susan Neylan. 2015. “Raven Plays Ball: Situating ‘Indian Sports Days’ within Indigenous and Colonial Spaces in Twentieth-Century Coastal British Columbia.” Canadian Journal of History, no. 3: 442. doi:10.3138/CJH.ACH.50.3.003.
    • Harvard:
      Downey, A. and Neylan, S. (2015) ‘Raven plays ball: situating “Indian Sports Days” within indigenous and colonial spaces in twentieth-century coastal British Columbia’, Canadian Journal of History, (3), p. 442. doi: 10.3138/CJH.ACH.50.3.003.
    • Harvard: Australian:
      Downey, A & Neylan, S 2015, ‘Raven plays ball: situating “Indian Sports Days” within indigenous and colonial spaces in twentieth-century coastal British Columbia’, Canadian Journal of History, no. 3, p. 442, viewed 20 July 2019, .
    • MLA:
      Downey, Allan, and Susan Neylan. “Raven Plays Ball: Situating ‘Indian Sports Days’ within Indigenous and Colonial Spaces in Twentieth-Century Coastal British Columbia.” Canadian Journal of History, no. 3, 2015, p. 442. EBSCOhost, doi:10.3138/CJH.ACH.50.3.003.
    • Chicago/Turabian: Humanities:
      Downey, Allan, and Susan Neylan. “Raven Plays Ball: Situating ‘Indian Sports Days’ within Indigenous and Colonial Spaces in Twentieth-Century Coastal British Columbia.” Canadian Journal of History, no. 3 (2015): 442. doi:10.3138/CJH.ACH.50.3.003.
    • Vancouver/ICMJE:
      Downey A, Neylan S. Raven plays ball: situating “Indian Sports Days” within indigenous and colonial spaces in twentieth-century coastal British Columbia. Canadian Journal of History [Internet]. 2015 [cited 2019 Jul 20];(3):442. Available from: http://widgets.ebscohost.com/prod/customlink/proxify/proxify.php?count=1&encode=0&proxy=&find_1=&replace_1=&target=http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=edsgao&AN=edsgcl.443457665&authtype=sso&custid=s1007886